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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
holdouts of an era when democrats dominated texas politics. brooks supported civil rights and refused to sign the segregation southern manifesto in 1956 and went on to right the civil rights act of 1964. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. >>> and which political story will make head leans in 24 hours contributor and manager editor, chris cizzilis rejoins us. when do you think they get down to seriously talking and you keep hearing that there's some optimism here of people who are really smart players. it's hard to find the signs of it. >> well, andrea, i would predict they won't in 24 hours. look. i do think -- i think the reason for optimism that you hear is because people don't believe politicians will willingly put themselves in a situation of tremendous uncertainty. that is, going over the cliff. no one knows what would happen. we all think, oh, there's economists saying it wo
, and in some states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempts at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can the republican party do about it? big questions. j.c. watts, former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor, or rather put it this way, against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know it backfire
the international covenant of civil and political rights on express understanding that he was not self-executing. so it did not create applications enforceable in the federal court. the supreme court in the united states has told at the very standard applied in this treaty that is not self-executing means nobody has access to any quarter. there is no enforceable right to get anybody in america create in this treaty. the mac to enter the senator, i'm not aware of the specific british request and what response they drew. i would only say this. it's important, mr. president to understand whether distemper senator from massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth u
texas. he helped write the civil rights act of 1964, the voting rights act. he didn't care much for president nixon, even saying he would have voted to impeach him the day he was inaugurated but it wouldn't have looked good. he helped draft nixon's articles of impeachment. brooks ran the kennedy presidential campaign in his texas district. he was also there the day he was killed and stood next to lyndon johnson as he was sworn in on air force one. by the way according to "the new york times", one of johnson's aides said brooks was one of the few men johnson was ever afraid of. brooks died at a baptist hospital from a sudden illness. he was 89 years old. >>> well, the president and republicans agree on very little in their fiscal proposals. with one glaring exception. neither proposal specifically includes defense cuts. in fact, both sides have gone out of their way to say they shouldn't happen. but if there's no deal, they may happen anyway. in today's "deep dive" how the sequester could impact our military, our economy, and our safety. the budget control act calls for about a t
that have no beliefs in civil liberties, countries who are terrible on human rights and we say we're going to put you in charge of decisions -- >> that's not what it does. it forces them to live up to standards that we believe in. >> no, it doesn't. where does it say in there the other countries will live up to our standards. >> that's what the treaty does. it seds down standards. >> it does not say -- >> john, happy holidays. bob shrum -- >> giving away all our power. >> sometimes it comes down to how we look at the world. republicans made no secret to keep democrats from voting. is it possible those voter i.d. laws, the photo i.d. laws, actually encouraged african-americans among others to defy the gop and go out and vote. i kneel happened. i have heard that happened. let's hear about it. did it happen? did blacks and others say screw you, you're not going to stop me the from voting. let's find out how it worked. we'll be right back. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are re
to be the chair of the judiciary committee subcommittee on constitution and human rights and civil rights. we've had a series of hearings on the issues of human rights and laws in the united states that affect them. i've also been honored to join with senator cardin of maryland, who chairs our helsinki commission senate delegation on several trips overseas where he's made human rights a major part of the agenda of that commission and of the united states. that's why one of the aspects of this bill before us is so important. sadly today in russia, country of russia we are seeing evidence of brutal, horrific treatment of individuals and abuses of human rights. senator cardin, whom i said earlier is a great voice on human rights in the senate, introduced legislation in this congress that would impose u.s. visa bans and asset freezes on those who commit gross human rights violations around the world. that was the cardin amendment, which i thought was a good one. the idea was just sefrp. those who -- just simple. those who commit such acts shouldn't be allowed to visit our country. period. this ca
compliance with the legislation. laws such as the civil rights rs act, title 9, the family leave act strengthen our position. most importantly, i'm reminded of the veterans who have returned from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. the brave veterans who have served in all the places we have asked them to go, who have advanced the interests and ideals of the united states. we owe them a debt for their service. many of them have returned with severe wounds, some requiring lifetime care. and i'd like to just read a statement from one of the veterans that appeared in front of the foreign relations committee, a disabled attorney and veteran -- marine veteran john lancaster. and this is what he said. and i quote here. "in 1968 i arrived in vietnam in the tet ow offensive as an infay platoon commander. five months later i was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the poli
bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. i do not want to argue civil rights with anybody in japan about the history. i think we are past that. my whole purpose for being here is to honor the dead, to listen to the living, and to see that this does not happen again. >> in washington, he discusses the inspiration for his trip and his meetings with bomb survivors. >> several governors met with president obama tuesday to discuss the soda ash called fiscal cliff and its impact on states and the economy. -- the so-called fiscal clef. members of the national governors' association spoke to reporters but the white house for about 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. i am the chair of the national governors' association, the governor of the telephone, -- of delaware, joined by the governor of oklahoma, the vice chair. and we are also joined by the governors of wisconsin and arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say it was a very good meeting with the president. the issues we face as governors and states are considered as p
the civil rights act and the voting rights act and the americans with disabilities act, is still capable of voting to change things, let alone send a message that could change the world. i ask colleagues to do for the world what they've done for america -- walk down the aisle here and for millions everywhere who cannot walk make a stateme statement. raise your voice and vote for millions who are voiceless in their own lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer:
the unsolved civil rights crimes, i actually work with a guy who's trying to do that and i blocked it until i could make it effective, was demonized for that. you know, those words hurt, but those words, they are not true so if you feel good about yourself, trying to do the right thing even though it means you're going to take all sorts of hits, the haiti fund with all the big fox network people came to me because we have some clear oversight and could see what we're doing, several areas like that. but i'm kind of used to doing it. i'm pretty careful. i think every penny we spent ought to be spent right. i don't think we ought to waste a first penny, and so i don't mind taking heat, asking questions and taking time trying to figure out where we're going to spend the money, and whether not it's going to be spent effectively and whether or not we're going to the transparency to see whether it is spent effectively. >> host: tom coburn in his his second term. when is this one up? >> guest: 16. >> host: no way you're going to run again. how many terms have you served up? >> guest: three. >> host:
happy. >> stephanie: happy as a clown. but you don't think your brother has a right to get married? >> caller: they can have civil liberties but as far as marriage that's between a man and woman. you can adopt a kid, and think about it two men having a kid two women having a kid. really that would be a miracle, right? >> stephanie: well, yeah. what does mr. road flair mary do? >> caller: mr. road flair mary? >> your husband. >> stephanie: what does he do? >> caller: he drives a truck. >> stephanie: oh congratulations. don't you think i should be able to be married for 31 years. >> caller: yes. >> stephanie: oh i tricked you. >> caller: listen, i marched in the gay parades in chicago with my brother. >> stephanie: you did? >> caller: civil liberties, fine. but marriage know. >> stephanie: i feel we have made progress. maybe you are right. maybe couples therapy is bull [ censor bleep ]. >> caller: you can go to therapy, pay the money, do what you want. i don't play that way. i don't need somebody telling me how to live. >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: think about it, i c
, the question is, could you do something to shorten this brutal, dirty civil war or are you going to do nothing or continue along the path that you are right now and have a long, extended war? >> and if we are waiting for russia to come around and pave the way to a u.n. resolution similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that that waiting will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point, anyway, from my vantage point. maybe i have been proved wrong. approving of a u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that secretary of state hillary clinton has had with the russian foreign minister, it's not like everybody is on the same page. they're not. obviously, the russians are looking at this very closely because they can see their client busard is in a very tricky situation and do they want to be on the losing side? on the same token, with the u.s. not really being involved has not really many friends on the ground in syria. what happens if bashar falls? who do you talk to and have relations with on the ground? i know they have come up with this coalition, this
to shorten this brutal, dirty civil war, or are you going to do nothing or continue along the path that you are right now and have a long, extended war? >> and if we are waiting on russia to come around and pave the way, similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point anyway, from my vantage point, maybe i'll be proved wrn ed wrong, approving u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that hillary clinton has had, it's not like it's suddenly kumbaya and everybody's on the same page. they're not. obviously the russians are la looking at this very closely because they can tell that their client, assad, is in a very tricky situation. but by the very same token, the u.s. without being involved now really has not many friends on the ground in syria. so what happens if assad somehow falls? who do you then talk to? who do you then have relations with on the ground? i know they've come up with a coalition, this opposition coalition. but that too has yet to fully prove itself as an effective and consolidated oppositi
to this decendant of that legendary civilization. olympia is a true leader who has always devoted her considerable intellect, energy and commitment to doing what was right for maine and for america. olympia snowe has dedicated her life to public service. 18 years in the united states senate preceded by 16 representing maine's second congressional district, plus 5 in the maine legislature add up to a remarkable record of commitment to our nation and the great state of maine. but that span of nearly four decades tells us only part of the story. for olympia has truly set the gold standard for public service. from the statehouse to the u.s. capitol, olympia has built an outstanding reputation as an informed, thoughtful and effective legislator. she can always be counted on as a leader with integrity who pursued solutions and who had no interest in just scoring partisan political points. it is olympia's character that has made all that difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character, so i want to share with my colleagues this morning a story about
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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